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Kagle
Kagel infobox
Occupation Track security guard and loan shark
Actor Peter Appel
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Kagle, played by Peter Appel, is a track security guard and loan shark.

BiographyEdit

Season 1Edit

Luck (pilot)Edit

Main article: Luck (pilot)

Kagle asks Marcus, Jerry and Renzo to move along. Marcus sarcastically asks if anyone is morbidly fat and if anyone ordered a heart attack. Kagle says that he would not hold his breath, and then notes that Marcus cannot. Marcus asks when Kagle last saw his genitals without using a mirror. Jerry asks Kagle if he is looking at the pick six and Kagle admits that he holds a few opinions. Kagle asks if Jerry is going to bet and then moves along. Renzo tells Marcus that there might be more development at the coffee shop. Marcus asks Renzo to clarify and Renzo persists with being mysterious, explaining that he does not want to say in case it does not happen. Marcus calls Renzo a moron. Marcus warns Jerry not to borrow money from Kagle because of his high interest rate (3% a week).

Jerry returns to the track and approaches Kagle. Kagle senses Jerry’s urgency and wonders if Jerry would lend himself $1000 in his position. Jerry is confused and says that he is not asking for $1000. Kagle elucidates that he is operating a one policy for all system with a $1000 minimum. Jerry wonders why and complains that Kagle is his own boss. Kagle counters that he does not feel self employed given his uniform and Jerry retorts that he is self employed as a shylock. Jerry wonders if one pant size fits everyone and Kagle is irritated, believing Jerry is referencing his weight. Jerry claims that he said hat size. Kagle reasserts his conditions, $1000 minimum with 3% weekly interest, and adds that he does not want to have to chase Jerry for the interest on small loans. Jerry agrees to the offer and Kagle then says that Jerry doesn’t qualify. Jerry swears and walks away. Kagle calls him back and holds out two $50 bills, looking around nervously. Kagle asks Jerry to give him his picks in exchange and Jerry does so, demonstratively annoyed.

Kagel does not bet using the picks but later realises that Jerry's syndicate is holding a winning ticket having spread their bets across the entire field in the sixth race. Kagel approaches them and offers them the opportunity to use a go-between to accept their winnings to avoid the IRS becoming aware of their identities for a fee. Marcus realises that Kagel did not bet. Kagel admits that he thought the picks were wrong, particularly backing Escalante’s horse in the fourth race, and says that he did not want to waste $864 buying the required number of tickets. Marcus crows about their victory. Kagel observes that Marcus cannot resist humiliating him. Jerry says that no-one is trying to humiliate him and Kagel asks Jerry to tell that to whoever put him in his overweight body. Marcus jokes that it was someone called Ronald McDonald. The screen displays the possible payouts (based on the number of betters who will share the jackpot) for each horse in the final race winning. The sixth and eighth horses are reported as being the maximum winners. Lonnie notes that lowest payout is $48,840 and Renzo says there would be nothing wrong with that. Marcus jokes that he would prefer the full 2.7 million as it would be less of an adjustment.

Episode 1.2Edit

Main article: Episode 1.2

Kagle approaches Jerry and Marcus as they arrive at the track. He pats Marcus’ clothes, asking if he ever washes them. Marcus is irate and swears at Kagle before steering his wheelchair at him. Jerry says that they were talking and Kagle leaves after offering them a chance to invest in his money lending business.

RelationshipsEdit

  • Marcus: Gambler and track regular
  • Jerry: Gambler, debtor and track regular
  • Renzo: Gambler and track regular
  • Lonnie: Gambler

Memorable QuotesEdit

AppearancesEdit

Season one appearances
Luck Episode 1.2 Episode 1.3
Episode 1.4 Episode 1.5 Episode 1.6
Episode 1.7 Episode 1.8 Episode 1.9
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